Saturday Song: Harry Chapin, “Taxi”

Was this your first experience of Harry Chapin’s wonderful songs? It was for me. I felt deeply moved by the story of two old friends meeting by chance one rainy night. The song taught me that life doesn’t always work out the way we dreamt.

Hear Harry Chapin’s “Taxi” here.

When I first heard this song in the spring of 1972, I felt determined that I was going to be a television repair man. In spite of my poor vision, I felt convinced I could earn my living fixing electronics. And all the adults telling me I couldn’t do such a job just made me more determined to prove them wrong.

After considerable arguing with the electronics class teacher, I enrolled and did well on the theory. The practical aspect was another matter. Though I tried hard to reconcile the schematic diagrams with the radios and other electronic gadgets, I failed miserably.

In December of 1974, the teacher gave me the bad news that I couldn’t continue in his class. Televisions had extremely high voltages in them and he feared I’d get electrocuted.

Instead of fixing people’s TVs, I’m a writer. I never drempt I’d be one either. And as for TV repair, nobody fixes electronics anymore.

Romans 11:33 (KJV) says, “O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!” All I can say to that is “Amen!”

So, what are your memories of this song? Did you become what you’d hoped to be as an adult? Please leave me a comment in the box below. And if you don’t feel like it, have a nice weekend anyway.

My next post will be about how some people mistreat folks who suffer tragedies. Hang in for that one.

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Saturday Song: Big Brother and the Holding Company, “Piece of My Heart”

Sep02This song always reminds me of September, 1968. I was back at Jericho Hill School for the Deaf and Blind, facing three more months of misery. My only comfort was a pocket radio which my parents bought me.

With some songs, I even remember the moment I first heard them. As I trudged up the grassy hill to the dorm after lunch one sunlit Saturday, this great song came blasting out of the speaker. I immediately loved it.

Hear “Piece of My Heart” here.

The woman in the song sure had a difficult time loving her two-timing man. She adored him but he was being an inconsiderate jerk to her. Sadly, this happens all too often.

In our Christian walk, we frequently encounter people who need plenty of forgiveness. Old habits die hard and we all slip back into them easily. Holding grudges is one bad habit we need to ditch immediately or sooner.

Neither is this a new problem. Matthew 18:21 (KJV) says, “Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times?”

But Jesus replied in Luke 17:4 (KJV), “And if he trespass against thee seven times in a day, and seven times in a day turn again to thee, saying, I repent; thou shalt forgive him.” In other words, there is no limit.

And why should we keep forgiving difficult siblings in Christ, apart from the fact that Jesus said so? 2 Corinthians 2:7 (KJV)explains, “So that contrariwise ye ought rather to forgive him, and comfort him, lest perhaps such a one should be swallowed up with overmuch sorrow.”

So, what do you think of this song and what I wrote? Please comment in the box below. But if you’d rather not, have a great weekend anyway.

Saturday Song: ‘Tar and Cement’ by Verdelle Smith

city buildings @ nightEven though I was only nine years old when I heard this song on my mom’s radio, it still touched my soul. This was because I had been sent from my home in the town of Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta to a school for blind children in the metropolis of Vancouver B.C.

In this song, the person left the familiarity of the small town for the money and excitement of the big city. Like many people, the grass seemed greener on the far side of the fence.

When the protagonist returned to that once-small town, it had become acres of tar and cement. Gone were the lilacs which perfumed the air. Gone was the child-like joy of running through the grass and enjoying merely being alive.

Fort Saskatchewan is now a city. Where a farmer’s field and the town dump used to be is now a conglomeration of big box stores. And half of the forest at the creek where I used to play has become a parking lot for fast food joints and industries.

Even the vibrant downtown has been subdued because of big box stores siphoning off customers. And the Fort Hotel, one of my favourite landmarks, burned to the ground back in 2010.

As I’ve pointed out before, we can’t relive the past. So what can we do? Follow the Apostle Paul’s example. Philippians 3:13-14 (KJV)reads, “Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.”

Saturday Song, ‘El Paso’

My good friend Abbie Taylor has been writing a feature on her blog called “Saturday Song” where she writes about significant music in her life and she also provides links to them. I like this idea so much that I’ve decided to do this on my blog too. After all, religious subjects can be intense and burdensome. So let’s have one day of lightness to offset the heaviness.

“El Paso”texas is my favourite Marty Robins song. It’s the earliest song I can recall. In 1959, I was only three years old but somehow the song stuck with me.

Though “El Paso” is about murder, jealousy, and cowboy justice, this song gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling. Like in the movies, the actors all get up and become themselves again when the director yells, “Cut!”

That’s how I feel when I hear Marty’s classic song. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Is Sin the Cause of Disabilities?

jul21aThe question of retribution for past or ancestral sin is one which people have pondered for millennia. In superstitious cultures, people assumed that disabled folks were cursed for some misdeed done in this or a previous life. Even I was the victim of such heartless speculation.

When I joined a charismatic house church, the minister and the woman in whose house services were held assumed I could be healed by them. After every attempt of the congregation as they spoke in tongues and placed hands on my head, my vision never improved. Instead of consoling me, the elders accused me of lacking faith to be healed

Instead of asking themselves if their faith was strong enough, they blamed me for hidden sin, lacking faith, ancestral sin, and lusting for sight. No matter how hard I squelched all doubts, my vision remained poor.
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A minister in Zambia named Chipita Sibale preached a pertinent sermon recently on people to avoid and why they should be shunned. His comment on John 9:1-3 was especially relevant to me.

The passage in the Bible in Basic English reads, “And when he went on his way, he saw a man blind from birth. And his disciples put a question to him, saying, ‘Master, was it because of this man’s sin, or the sin of his father and mother, that he has been blind from birth?’ Jesus said in answer, ‘It was not because of his sin, or because of his father’s or mother’s; it was so that the works of God might be seen openly in him.'”

One fact that Chipita noted was that this uncaring attitude breeds indifference in people. They soon lack compassion for sufferers and blame them or their families for the disability.
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This certainly was true of the cultic church which I stupidly attended for more than fifteen years. In retrospect, I can see plainly how heartless such judge mental people were.

In my book called How I Was Razed, I detailed the cult’s ridiculous doctrines and how the heavenly father rescued me. Read about this wonderful testimony of his loving grace at Amazon.

Why is Christianity so Full of Rules?

A stack of very old hard cover print books.Where do people get the notion that Christianity is just a bunch of DOs and DON’Ts? Study the New Testament and you’ll find out that there aren’t as many “rules” as people think. Let me explain why this is.

Jesus Christ said that the whole Old Testament law hung on two commandments: love God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength and love your neighbour as yourself. That’s all a Christian needs to do.

I liken the Old Testament law and Christ’s new commandments to be similar to MS DOS and Windows, though the analogy is a bit shaky. To start a program in DOS, you needed to type in its exact name or initials. In Windows, you click on an icon and the program starts. That’s much easier for most people.

The Old Testament Ten Commandments, and subsequent ordinances, were like DOS in that they were specific. Christ’s commandments, like Windows, are both intuitive.

How is this so? When you love God, you won’t make any idols and bow down to worship them. You automatically want to put the Lord first in every aspect of your life. Neither would you murder, lie under oath, covet what isn’t yours, dishonor your parents, or do any other evil thing. In fact, you will naturally want to worship the Lord and do good things for others.

Some folks think this is too simplistic. They want to impose rules upon rules to keep people in line. That is why many denominations have come up with regulations which aren’t in the Bible or have been superceded by the New Testament. These legalists want to go back to Sabbath worship and some think certain activities such as gambling and listening to rock music are sinful. Truly, there’s no “thou Shalt not gamble” commandment in either testament.

I know from bitter experience about legalism. The cult church elders objected to me listening to rock music, talking on the CB, and the like. They also treated me cruelly because of my poor vision. I wrote about how God delivered me from those false Christians in a book called How I Was Razed. This glorious testimony of God’s providential grace is available directly from me.