Why Was Jesus the Lamb of God?

mar15Previously, I explained the need for an animal sacrifice to show the Israelites the sinfulness of sin in a graphic way. During Passover, the commemoration of the Israelites’ liberation from Egyptian bondage, a lamb without defect was kept in the house for a few days. He was then slaughtered, cooked, and eaten during the Passover supper.

Jesus was called the Lamb of God because he would be the ultimate Passover sacrifice. John 1:29 (KJV) explains, “The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, ‘Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.'”

The next day, John the Baptist also exclaimed mar15ato two of his followers in verse thirty-six, “And looking upon Jesus as he walked, he saith, ‘Behold the Lamb of God!'” They both recognized what that meant and followed Christ afterward.

The other John used the image of the Lamb of God in Revelation 5:6 (KJV), “And I beheld, and, lo, in the midst of the throne and of the four beasts, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent forth into all the earth.” Read further in that chapter and you’ll see it’s Christ which John is alluding to.

The Bible is fancient scrollilled with phrases which mean far more than their literal interpretation would suggest. This is partly why I’m writing my next book called You Think Your Going to Heaven? People need to know how serious their decision is to follow or reject Christ. They also need to understand all these strange expressions we Christians use. My hope is to reach seekers through my writing and direct them to the correct path to heaven. Watch this space for updates on the book.

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Author: bruce Atchison - author

I'm a legally-blind freelance writer as well as the author of three memoirs and scores of articles. Contact me for details.

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