THE BLAME GAME.

ImageNobody needs to teach children how to blame others. It comes naturally. The first two humans started it and we’ve kept up the tradition. As Genesis 3:9 to 13 says, ”   And the LORD God called unto Adam, and said unto him, ‘Where are you?’ And he said, ‘I heard your voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself.’ And he said, ‘Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded you that you should not eat?’ And the man said, ‘The woman whom you gave to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat.’ And the LORD God said unto the woman, ‘What is this that you have done?’ And the woman said, ‘The serpent misled me, and I did eat.’

When I was a child, my sister and I blamed an invisible man for anything that we did wrong. Mr. Nobody, as we called him, was the one we blamed for the missing cookies. If Mom found something broken, Mr. Nobody did it. If something was written on the wall in crayon, it was obvious to us that Mr Nobody wrote it.

Later on in life, I rationalized my misdemeanors with the excuse that I deserved to have fun or treats. I shoplifted cake sprinkles because I figured the store would never miss them. I took a letter puzzle board from a friend’s home because I wanted to play with it more. Later on, I sneakily dropped it behind a bed so that the parents would think it merely was misplaced. I smashed some windows in a shed because some were already broken. It seemed like the opportunity of a lifetime to get in some fun and take out my frustrations against the school for the blind. In junior high, I followed the lead of other boys by grabbing packets of crackers out of a vending machine rather than paying for them.

As an adult, I yeilded to temptation and rationalized my wickedness away. I bought a CB radio with additional channels and spoke to others on frequencies not assigned to the General Radio Service. I also spoke to people thousands of miles away when atmospheric conditions were right, even though the CB was only meant for local communications. I thought the rules were petty and that nobody would mind as everybody was doing it. I learned later that radio frequencies are rented out to businesses. They have to pay a fee each year to retain their usage of them. Not only did I trespass on these companies frequencies but I disobeyed the government’s rule about local communications for CB operators.

A dozen years ago, I used to cut across railway land to get to town. Even though there were no signs, I felt convicted about this trespassing that I did. I read in The Railway Act that nobody without a valid reason to be on railway land could cross it except at designated crossing points. Apart from one time when I needed to go to the bathroom badly, I never trespassed again on that strip of land.

Though I got away with some of my illegal and immoral activities, they didn’t escape God’s notice. A time will come when everybody will have to account for what they did in this life. Since I asked the Lord for forgiveness for all my wrongdoings, I’m grateful to Jesus Christ for taking the punishment meant for me on the cross.

In How I Was Razed: A Journey from Cultism to Christianity, I wrote about how the heavenly Father guided me out of darkness and into the marvelous light of his truth. Amazon and Barnes & Noble distribute the e-book edition while Virtual Bookworm stocks the paperback version. My previous memoirs are at the Bruce Atchison’s books page.

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Author: bruce Atchison - author

I'm a legally-blind freelance writer as well as the author of How I Was Razed, Deliverance from Jericho, and When a Man Loves a Rabbit. Two of those memoirs are available on my Blogspot page. How I Was Razed is available through Amazon and at the www.virtualbookworm.com page.

1 thought on “THE BLAME GAME.”

  1. What an honest and thoughtful entry. I enjoyed reading this Bruce. It’s funny what we think we can get away with in this life, isn’t it? We all have stories to share like this. You have to live and hopefully, learn from it. It sounds like you have.

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